70-200 Extension tubes and teleconverters

So I’ll admit it, I bit the bullet. In this post I talked about the problems with attaching my Nikon teleconverter to the Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 SP Di VC USD. Well this week, I could resist no longer, and filed a certain metal tab from the mount of my Nikon converter. Today I’m going to share some of the resuslts.

The first thing I should say is that this is not recommended. I made a calculated risk in doing this, based on the length of time I’ve had the converter, and a genuine interest in knowing if it would work or not. I’ve done this so that no-one else has to.

The good news is that it has in no way affected the 70-200. It still works. Big sigh of relief from me. However, the combination doesn’t work perfectly together. Oddly, the Vibration Compensation feature works brilliantly with the teleconverter attached. In fact, it works better with the Tamron than it does with the Nikon. What you do lose is smart EXIF data communication, and autofocus.

There is no updating of the change in effective aperture, and no way of reading the EXIF data to tell if a converter has been used. That’s not a deal-breaker. However, the lack of autofocus is a more difficult issue for me, as my eyesight can’t be relied on to ensure perfect foucs. So if you want to buy the Tamron lens, you’re going to have to stick to third-party converters.

On the bright side, that optical quality remains very high. Here’s a couple of shots taken of the same subject and more-or-less the same distance, the first without a converter and the second with:

_DSC8781 _DSC8783

Both are the full, un-cropped images, and while they have different characteristics, I would call both acceptable images.

With that out of the way, I started to experiment by adding extension tubes as well._DSC8859 _DSC8835

_DSC8833

In all cases, I was really happy with the results. It’s unlikely that I will use the lens like this every time, but it’ s good to know that it can deliver if required.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s